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Complete List of Property Tax Exemptions By State

Most states offer disabled Veterans property tax exemptions, which can save thousands each year depending on the location and the Veteran's disability rating.

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After a multi-year, nationwide effort to lessen the financial strain on qualified disabled Veterans, almost every state in the U.S. offers some sort of property tax exemption for disabled Veterans.

"If you're a disabled Veteran, in almost every single jurisdiction, you can petition your local taxing authority and you can have all of your local real estate taxes waived." said Mike Frueh, former National Director of the VA Home Loan program. "That's a fantastic benefit."

And that benefit could save you thousands.

Do Veterans Pay Property Taxes?

Veterans may be entitled to property tax exemption for their primary residence. Eligibility and the amount of the exemption typically depends on disability rating, state, county, and city.

Property Tax Exemptions by State

Here is a short summary of each state's property tax exemptions available to Veterans who qualify. To make sure you qualify, be sure to click the link next to the summary to see your state's complete tax exemption requirements.

Exemption amounts, rates and conditions can vary by county or city just as they do by state. Veterans should contact their local municipal tax assessor's office to check for localized exemptions.

State

Minimum Disability Requirement

Alabama Disabled Veterans in Alabama may receive a full property tax exemption if they have a 100% disability rating or are over the age of 65. The property cannot exceed 160 acres and must be a single-family home listed as the Veteran's primary residence.
See all exemption requirements →
Alaska Veterans with a disability rating of 50% or more may receive a property tax exemption up to the first $150,000 of the assessed value of their primary residence. The exemption may transfer to the spouse if the Veteran has passed and the spouse is at least 60 years old.
See all exemption requirements →
Arizona In Arizona, totally and permanently disabled Veterans may qualify for a property tax exemption of up to $4,188 on their primary residence. Veterans must be permanent residents of Arizona, and the property's assessed value cannot exceed $28,458.
See all exemption requirements →
Arkansas Disabled Veterans who have lost a limb or the use of a limb, are totally blind in one or both eyes, or have a 100% disability rating can receive a full property tax exemption in Arkansas. The exemption is valid for all state taxes on the homestead and personal property owned by the disabled Veteran. Surviving spouses, as long as they remain unmarried, and dependent children during their minority, may obtain the exemption if the Veteran passes.
See all exemption requirements →
California Veterans with a 100% disability rating, or who are compensated at the 100% rate due to unemployability, may qualify for a property tax exemption in California. In 2023, qualifying Veterans can receive a property tax exemption of up to $161,083 on the full value of their property or up to $241,627 for Veterans whose annual household income does not exceed $72,335. The property must be your primary residence.
See all exemption requirements →
Colorado Veterans with a 100% disability rating in Colorado may receive a property tax exemption of 50% of the first $200,000 of the full value of their primary residence. This property tax deferral exists for eligible Veterans over the age of 65 and for active duty personnel.
See all exemption requirements →
Connecticut Disabled Veterans with a minimum disability rating of 75% in Connecticut may receive a property tax exemption of $3,000 from the total assessed value of their property. This deferral is for Veterans who served at least 90 days of active duty during wartime and are honorably discharged. Disabled Veterans with a disability rating of 10%-75% are eligible for a $1,500 deduction. For more seriously disabled Veterans, there may be an additional $10,000.
See all exemption requirements →
Delaware Veterans in Delaware with a 100% disability rating and who have held residency in Delaware for at least 3 years may be eligible for a tax credit against 100% of non-vocational school district property tax.
See all exemption requirements →
Florida Resident Veterans in Florida with at least a 10% disability rating are entitled to a $5,000 deduction on the assessment of their home for tax purposes. Resident Veterans in Florida with a 100% disability rating may receive a full property tax exemption. Other homestead exemptions may exist for Veterans over the age of 65 and surviving spouses.
See all exemption requirements →
Georgia Disabled Veterans with a 100% disability rating in Georgia may receive a property tax exemption of up to $50,000 plus an additional sum from paying property taxes for county, municipal, and school purposes, depending on a fluctuating index rate set by the U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs. The current amount for 2023 is $98,492.
See all exemption requirements →
Hawaii Disabled Veterans in Hawaii may receive a full property tax exemption on their primary residence if the Veteran is 100% disabled as a result of service. Exemptions may vary based on which county the Veteran resides. Click the links to see tax exemptions for Hawaii County, Honolulu County, Maui County and Kauai County.
See all exemption requirements →
Idaho Veterans with a 100% disability rating, or who receive 100% compensation due to unemployability, may reduce their property taxes by $1,500 in Idaho. The Veteran must own and live in the home as their primary residence before April 15, 2023. The property must have a current homeowner's exemption. Mobile homes are eligible.
See all exemption requirements →
Illinois Veterans and surviving spouses in Illinois may qualify for a property tax exemption. Eligibility and exemption amounts can vary depending on disability rating, if the tax is for specially adapted housing, and if the Veteran has recently returned from active duty in an armed conflict involving the armed forces of the United States.
See all exemption requirements →
Indiana In Indiana, Veterans who served in WWII, Korea, Vietnam, or the Gulf War, received an honorable discharge, and have a disability rating of at least 10% qualify for a property tax exemption of $24,960 from the assessed value of the Veteran's property. Veterans who served in the military for at least 90 days, received an honorable discharge and have either a total service-connected disability or are 62 years old with a disability rating of at least 10% qualify for a deduction of $14,000 from the assessed value of the Veteran's property.
See all exemption requirements →
Iowa Veterans with a 100% disability rating from service-connected causes qualify for a full property tax exemption in Iowa. There is no limit to the amount of exemption, but only one property less than 40 acres in a rural area or less than 1/2 acre in an urban area may qualify. Surviving spouses may also receive the benefit if the Veteran has passed.
See all exemption requirements →
Kansas Veterans who are 50% or more disabled may receive a property tax exemption on their primary residence. Qualifying Veterans must be born before Jan. 1, 1967, blind or totally and permanently disabled all of 2022, regardless of your age, or have a dependent child who lived with the Veteran the entire year, was born before January 1, 2022, and under the age of 18 the entire year. The maximum refund is $700.
See all exemption requirements →
Kentucky Kentucky Veterans who are at least 65 years old or totally disabled as a result of military service may receive a property tax exemption of up to $46,350 for their primary residence. This limit changes annually for inflation and is for the 2023-2024 tax year.
See all exemption requirements →
Louisiana Veterans in Louisiana who have a 100% service-connected disability rating or a 100% unemployability rating from the VA may receive a full parish property tax exemption. Veterans with a disability rating of 99% or less and their spouses may be eligible for a partial property tax exemption up to $120,000 based on rating.
See all exemption requirements →
Maine Veterans who are at least 62 years old or have a disability rating of 100% (service or nonservice related) may qualify for a property tax exemption up to $6,000 in Maine. A Veteran who receives a federal grant for a specially adapted housing unit may receive an exemption of up to $50,000.
See all exemption requirements →
Maryland A Veteran who is 100% disabled as a result of service may qualify for a full property tax exemption on their primary property in Maryland. Surviving spouses of military personnel killed in the line of duty may also qualify for this exemption.
See all exemption requirements →
Massachusetts Veterans in Massachusetts who have at least a 10% disability rating, lived in the state for six months prior to enlisting, OR lived in the state for five consecutive years may receive a property tax exemption. An exemption of $400 may be awarded if the Veteran is 10% or more disabled, a Purple Heart Recipient or Gold Star parent. A $750 exemption may be awarded if the Veteran lost the use of one hand, one foot or one eye; $1,250 if the Veteran lost the use of both hands, both feet or a combination of the two; or if the Veteran is blind in both eyes as a result of service. A Veteran may receive a $1,500 exemption if 100% disabled as a result of service.
See all exemption requirements →
Michigan Michigan Veterans who are 100% disabled from service may qualify for a full property tax exemption on their primary residence. The state also offers a homestead tax credit and property tax relief for active military personnel.
See all exemption requirements →
Minnesota Veterans who have at least a 70% disability rating may receive a property tax exemption of up to $150,000 in Minnesota. 100% disabled Veterans can qualify for a higher exemption up to $300,000. Surviving spouses of military personnel are eligible to receive a $300,000 exclusion.
See all exemption requirements →
Mississippi Any honorably discharged Veteran with a service-connected total disability is exempt from all property taxes on the assessed value of homestead property. Unmarried surviving spouses of eligible Veteran homeowners may also qualify.
See all exemption requirements →
Missouri Veterans who have a 100% disability rating in Missouri may receive a credit up to $1,100 for property taxes on their primary residence. Former Prisoners of War also qualify for this exemption.
See all exemption requirements →
Montana Veterans and their spouses in Montana may receive a property tax exemption on their primary residence if the Veteran has a 100% disability rating. The exemption amount is based on income and marital status.
See all exemption requirements →
Nebraska Nebraska Veterans with a 100% disability rating may receive a property tax exemption on their home. The exemption is based on marital status and total household income.
See all exemption requirements →
Nevada A disabled Veteran in Nevada may receive a property tax exemption of up to $30,800 of the assessed value of their primary residence if the Veteran is 100% disabled as a result of service. Veterans with a disability rating between 60%-79% are eligible for a $15,400 deduction, and Veterans with a disability rating of 80%-90% are eligible for a $23,100 reduction.
See all exemption requirements →
New Hampshire New Hampshire Veterans that are 100% disabled may receive a full property tax exemption on their primary residence and a tax credit of $701, but taxing authorities may increase this up to $4,000.
See all exemption requirements →
New Jersey A disabled Veteran in New Jersey may receive an annual tax exemption on their primary residence if they are 100% totally and permanently disabled during active duty service. Must be a legal resident of New Jersey.
See all exemption requirements →
New Mexico Veterans with a 100% disability rating in New Mexico will receive a full tax exemption if their property is occupied by the disabled Veteran and is the Veteran's principal place of residence.
See all exemption requirements →
New York There are three different property tax exemptions that Veterans may qualify for in New York. Exemptions apply to county, city, town and village taxes. Getting a tax exemption is not automatic, and initial applications are often due in the spring.
See all exemption requirements →
North Carolina North Carolina Veterans who either are 100% disabled or receive benefits for specially adapted housing under 38 U.S.C. 2101 can receive a property tax exemption of up to the first $45,000 of the appraised value of their primary residence.
See all exemption requirements →
North Dakota A disabled Veteran in North Dakota with at least a 50% disability rating is eligible for tax reductions of up to $8,100. Paraplegic Veterans may receive a property tax exemption for the first $120,000 on their primary residence or if they have been awarded specially adapted housing.
See all exemption requirements →
Ohio In Ohio, 100% disabled Veterans may qualify for a property tax exemption on up to $50,000 of the market value of their primary residence.
See all exemption requirements →
Oklahoma An honorably discharged Veteran who is 100% disabled is fully exempt from paying ad valorem taxes on their primary residence. Surviving spouses of Veterans killed in active duty may also receive the exemption.
See all exemption requirements →
Oregon Disabled Veterans in Oregon may receive a property tax exemption if the Veteran has a 40% or more disability rating. The Veteran must own and live on the homestead property. Exemption amounts vary annually according to income and typically increase by 3% each year. For 2023, the exemption amounts are $24,793 or $29,753. Surviving spouses may also be eligible.
See all exemption requirements →
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Veterans may be fully exempt from property taxes on their primary residence if the Veteran has a disability rating of 100% due to service-related causes. To receive the exemption, Veterans must show financial need. Those with an annual income below $108,046 are given a presumption of need for the exemption. Veterans with a gross annual income above $108,046 are considered to have a financial need for the exemption when their monthly expenses are more than their monthly household income.
See all exemption requirements →
Rhode Island Disabled Veterans may receive a property tax exemption on their primary residence in Rhode Island. Exemption amounts vary by county, the value of the property and the exemption category the Veteran falls into. The seven categories are Veterans' regular exemption, Partially Disabled Veteran, Totally Disabled Veteran, Unmarried Widow of Qualified Veteran, Gold Star Parents' exemption, Prisoner of War exemption and Specially Adapted Housing exemption.
See all exemption requirements →
South Carolina Veterans determined totally or permanently disabled from wartime may receive a property tax exemption on their home and land up to five acres. South Carolina also provides a property tax exemption on up to two vehicles for 100% disabled Veterans. Others who may qualify include Medal of Honor recipients, former Prisoners of War, and surviving spouses of eligible Veterans.
See all exemption requirements →
South Dakota Permanently disabled Veterans may qualify for a property tax exemption up to $150,000 on their home in South Dakota. The Veteran must have a disability rating of 100%, and the home must be occupied as the Veteran's primary residence. Paraplegic Veterans are eligible for a full property tax exemption.
See all exemption requirements →
Tennessee Tennessee provides property tax relief for disabled Veteran homeowners or surviving spouses. The Veteran must be rated permanently and totally disabled on or before Dec. 31, 2022, occupy the home as their primary residence and complete a 2022 F-16. The maximum market value the tax relief is calculated on is $175,000.
See all exemption requirements →
Texas Veterans in Texas may qualify for a property tax exemption depending on their disability rating. Veterans with a 100% disability rating are fully exempt from property taxes. 70-99% may receive a $12,000 exemption from their property's taxable value. 50%-69% may receive a $10,000 reduction from the property's value. 30-49% may receive a $7,500 exemption from the property's value. 10-29% may receive a $5,000 exemption from the property's value.
See all exemption requirements →
Utah Veterans with a service-connected disability rating of at least 10% may qualify for a property tax abatement in Utah. The specfic reduction is determined by the Veteran's disability rating with a maximum exemption amount of $275,699 for 100% service-connected disability. The amount is then subtracted from the taxable value of your primary residence.
See all exemption requirements →
Vermont Veterans with a disability rating of at least 50% may qualify for a property tax exemption on their primary residence in Vermont. The exemption is also available for Veterans who qualify for VA Pension and military retirement pay. Vermont mandates a minimum property tax exemption of $10,000 for Veterans in the municipal and education grand list. Surviving spouses and children of a disabled Veteran are also eligible as long as they occupy a primary residence in Vermont. This exemption is separate from the Department of your Homestead Declaration and Property Tax Credit Claim.
See all exemption requirements →
Virginia Permanently and totally disabled Veterans in Virginia may qualify for a full property tax exemption on their primary residence. Surviving spouses may also receive the exemption as long as they remain unmarried and occupies the primary residence.
See all exemption requirements →
Washington Washington provides a property tax relief for Veterans that have a disability rating of 80% or higher. The relief amount is based on income, the value of the residence and the local levy rates. Widows of disabled Veterans are also eligible.
See all exemption requirements →
West Virginia Veterans over the age of 65 and who are permanently disabled as a result of service are exempt from paying taxes on the first $20,000 of assessed value on their primary residence. Veterans must reside in West Virginia and have paid taxes on the primary residence for two consecutive taxable years. Surviving spouses may be eligible for the exemption, but only one can be granted for each owner-occupied residence.
See all exemption requirements →
Wisconsin Wisconsin provides a property tax credit for Veterans with a 100% disability rating who have lived in the state for at least five years. The property must be the Veteran's primary residence and only one acre or less. Unmarried surviving spouses are eligible as well.
See all exemption requirements →
Wyoming Disabled Veterans in Wyoming are eligible for a property tax exemption of $3,000 of the assessed value of their primary residence. Veterans must have lived in Wyoming for at least three years to qualify. If the exemption is not used by the Veteran or surviving spouse, they can apply the amount to their vehicle's license fee.
See all exemption requirements →
District of Columbia A Veteran must have a 100% disability rating to qualify for a property tax exemption in the District of Columbia. The exemption is limited to a $445,000 value, and the Veteran's household must be defined as eligible based on income and other factors. Veterans must complete and file with the District of Columbia Office of Veterans Affairs to receive the exemption.
See all exemption requirements →

How Veteran Property Tax Exemptions Work

Many states offer exemptions solely for disabled Veterans. However, every homeowner's situation is different. Here are some important things to remember about property tax exemptions:

  • Common exemptions include Veteran, Disabled Veteran, Homestead, Over 65 and more.
  • Not all Veterans or homeowners qualify for these exemptions.
  • Exemptions can vary by county and state.
  • You may be required to renew your exemption benefits annually.

Do You Understand Your Benefits?

Unfortunately, many Veterans, disabled and able alike, are often unaware of the plentiful benefits available to them. The VA's 2010 National Survey of Veterans found that 59 percent of respondents said "their understanding of available benefits was 'a little' or 'not at all.'"

The Government Accountability Office suggests complexity as a possible factor, while others blame a disconnect in communication between the Department of Veterans Affairs and administering localities. Regardless, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer notes property exemptions in particular as crucial benefits that allow Veterans to "afford a home and live stable civilian lives.

For more information about how your disability rating affects you as a Veteran homeowner or homebuyer read: How Your Disability Rating Affects Your VA Home Loan Benefit

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